Top Five Pet Safety Tips for Hanukkah

December 23, 2011

Photo of More Hannukah Dogs via Tosh.OSee this article’s original posting as a slide show on petMD Top Five Pet Safety Tips

Considering the media promotion and retail sales galore, our country’s collective conscience seems single mindedly focused on Christmas. We must not forget to consider pet safety around Christmas’ proverbial step-cousin, Hanukkah. Plan ahead and use common sense to keep Fido and Fluffy safe over Hanukkah and other holiday festivities.

Menorah

The Menorah is a quintessential Hanukkah symbol. Over eight successive days, the candles are ignited until the Menorah is fully ablaze. That can pose potential life threatening danger for both pets and humans, since tradition dictates the candles burn themselves out, creating a fire hazard for the entire household.

Confine your pet away from the room containing a lit Menorah, or update your Hanukkah observance by creating a pet-safe glow using battery operated candles.

Dreidel

The whirling excitement of this four sided top may attract the interest of curious pets. Avoid dangerous gastrointestinal foreign body obstructions by preventing your pet from participating in the festivities. Additionally, keep the dreidel and other holiday game pieces out of your pet’s reach when not in use.

Chocolate Gold Coins

Each Hanukkah, children eagerly wait to receive coin-shaped chocolates wrapped in gold or silver colored foil. Careless placement of these tasty treats could permit a curious pet to taste the precious bounty.

As chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine (both methylxanthine stimulants), a dog’s consumption of the faux denomination can cause severe toxicity. Also, the metallic foil wrapper, sugar, and fat all can cause gastrointestinal problems, including vomiting, diarrhea, and pancreatitis.

Latkes

Latkes are a savory Hanukkah treat harboring considerable toxic potential for pets. Potato and egg are combined with onion, fried in oil, and slathered with sour cream and/or applesauce. Fresh grated onion, one of the Latke’s three main ingredients, causes Heinz body anemia in both dogs and cats. Besides onion’s toxicity, Latkes are high in fat and carbohydrates, which are likely to upset your pet’s digestive tract.

Doughnuts

Doughnuts, also known as sufganiyot, are made of a fried dough filled with artificially colored red custard or jelly, and then sprinkled with powdered sugar. This celebratory pastry sounds tasty, yet is heavy on calories, fat, and sugar.

A pet’s ingestion of Hanukkah doughnuts could lead to gastrointestinal signs, including vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased appetite. Severe endocrine conditions, such as pancreatitis, can also ensue from your pet’s inappropriate sufganiyah consumption.

Have a safe and happy Hanukkah or other holiday celebration! Look out for my upcoming article about New Year’s resolutions for your pets.

Photo Credit Tosh.O/Comedy Central

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Copyright of this article (2011) is owned by Dr. Patrick Mahaney, Veterinarian and Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist. Republishing any portion of this article must first be authorized by Dr. Patrick Mahaney. Requests for republishing must be approved by Dr. Patrick Mahaney and received in written format.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Harlowe Thrombey December 9, 2012 at 8:03 PM

Good to know. Thanks, Doc.

Patrick Mahaney December 26, 2012 at 12:55 PM

You are welcome.
Thank you for your comments,
Dr. PM

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